Archives for posts with tag: tulips

Ah well we have been distracted a great deal since Christmas. No excuses really. However, a season of adventure in the outdoors is upon us and I thought we would just jump back in! Shall we start with some flower power?! 

Tulips! Tulips everywhere! First in my garden! 


They are glorious every year! But the allotment tulips this year outdid themselves! They all bloomed at once instead of in succession over 2 months. But I am not complaining! 

Aren’t I a lucky girl! 

But the major surprise of this season so far was the Norfolk tulip fields. I was not aware of these until mid April, so almost missed them. But now I know, it is not that surprising as our soils and climate mirror that of Holland across the North Sea. Here they grow the tulips for their bulbs! So they clip off the flower leaving the stems to nourish the bulbs before digging them up to be heat treated elsewhere. 

Luckily we found the field as they were cutting or we could have missed the season all together! This one was between Gayton and East Winch, although there are several throughout West Norfolk and Lincolnshire. 


There is a new twitter tag from coachcottage (Instagram account) going around to try and let people know about it next year. #Norfolktulipfestival see you then! 


Green

Since our last update the acid green buds on the the trees have mellowed to an apple green. Blossom flutters in the air; the sloes are putting on a good show this year. We walked down the lane from Wiveton to the coast road and the petals snowed down on our heads from above. 


Everything is starting to fill out and become lush. The vivid blue ceanothus clouds glow from garden walls. The long-awaited dark pink blossom on the corner of Saxlingham road has finally come out: warm magenta hues.

 The air is now full of birdsong. The nightingales’ serenade can now be heard. The odd cry of the Northern lapwing calls over Blakeney and Cley marsh. The first swan pair glide down Cley Channel. 


On Mariner’s Hill the tiny white flowers blanket the southface. They spread a little further each year, around the bluebells and fennel. In the evening light they glow like a snow dusting. 


Barefoot season has started with a walk down the harbour at low tide! I always say there are two halves to the year in Blakeney, barefoot season and welly season. So pleased! We have also had our first BBQ’s on Cley beach. Fishing and sea bass sandwiches! This also leads us to start work by on the boat again and planning for a launch date! 

In the allotment the squash seeds have gone in. Sweet pea seedlings go along the dahlia walk. I can’t wait for their sweet scent to fill the house all summer. In the kitchen, the smell of slow cooked gammon hocks over lentils permeates. Rhubarb, rhubarb, and more rhubarb! Crumble with Banana! With pomegranate in cheesecake. Allotment produce is increasingly finding its way onto the table. Locally caught crab from Andy’s Crab Shed on toast with pea shoots and avocado! Delicious. 

And the tulips continue their show in the courtyard, on the allotment, and at East Ruston Old Vicarage. A must see!


Tulips open


The long awaited tulip season has begun with the first early bulbs bursting into bloom. Our new bulbs from Pieter Nyssan have come out and the monte orange was a flamboyant opener to the season. It was followed by Royal Acres and then Princess Irene and Cardinal Red. The bunches picked on the allotment are filling the house with their musky honey scent. In the courtyard, last years pink tulips in the central bed glow in the evening light. At the same time some of our new bulbs, apricot parrot tulips and belle epoch, have filled the troughs under the window with a warm glow during the day. 


Elsewhere in the garden the Rosemary is flowering and the peony shoots have surfaced. On the allotment we have scattered Cosmo seeds in preparation for the floating flowers of Autumn and summers final call. 


Under the magnolias and on the hill sides swathes of blue bells flourish. On our walk behind Blakeney Downs on Kettlehill Plantation their soft scent fills the air. 
In Blakeney Cut the first tips of samphire can be seen just a few millimetres above the mud, a teaser of samphire on sourdough breakfasts to come. We have resumed our nightly visits to Mariners Hill, or Sunset Hill as we call it, to start the sunset season which lasts until October. The sun now sets North of Wells Pines and over the marsh in it yearly migration to The Point for the solstice. While not yet warm enough to sit with a cocktail, the colours of the evening sky make the trip magical. 


Inland the rape fields are vibrant yellow and the countryside seems to glow in their warm reflection. All around wildlife pairs up and this pageant is played out most formally by the bowing pigeons on the rooftops and tree branches. In Holkham Hall’s deer park, and my driveway, the Tawny owls start to roost; their haunting calls drifting in the twilight. 
In the kitchen gorse wine is set down, locking the coconut flavours in for a winters day. It will be at least nine months until it is ready. 


And hurrah! We have tasted the first crab of the season from Andy’s Crab Shack! A true marker of the shift of the seasons. 

First flowers of the year on the allotment!

 

 

Nothing says Spring like tulips in the courtyard! Here they are on a bright sunny day.

    

 I love the light shining through.

   
 
But I also love them at twilight. The pale pinks and white really glow in the evening.

   

 And lastly, with the solar lights. 

 
It’s often the simple things that give the greatest joy.