24 Seasons of Blakeney, March 6-21st

Lime

This season is one of renewal and rebirth in nature. The Japanese calendar refers to it as “awakening of the hibernated (insects)”, but I like to think of in terms of colour; lime. A bright acid green is common to many new shoots before they mature into the various shades of green for the summer, and spring has it in abundance.

March 6-21st: Lime

March 6-21st: Lime

March 6-21st: Lime

On of my favourite bright green plants of the this time of year is the Alexander. Last year we made a delicious chutney with aniseed flavours, but waited a bit too late when the stems had gone woody. This year we are doing it earlier. It is the first foraging produce of the year in our calendar.

March 6-21st: Lime

The animals are awaking  as well with the first frogs in the courtyard and driveway. Around the middle of the month the Great Tit returned to the birch over the courtyard to serenade us with his call. On the marsh, the swallows return as well as the chiffchaff.

  
March 6-21st: Lime

The bulbs are in full swing with daffodils, crocus, hyacinths, and snowdrops filling the gardens and churchyards of the area. Adding to the spectacle are leucojum. The afternoon sun has some warmth in it and we enjoyed our first afternoons sitting the courtyard in the swing. My favorite place to relax. And at the end of the season we can see the first tulip shoots, a sure sign of warmer weather on its way.

March 6-21st: Lime

March 6-21st: Lime

With all the bulbs out the large gardens have started to open to the public and for Mother’s Day we visited RHS Wisley this year.

March 6-21st: Lime

The seedlings for the upcoming allotment year are soldiering on, adding the bright green tone of the season.

March 6-21st: Lime

 

Holidays: Mother’s Day (UK)

Events: East Ruston Old Vicarage Gardens open for daffodil season/Mother’s Day, 6/3/16 http://www.e-ruston-oldvicaragegardens.co.uk/pages/view/564/home.htm

Chestnut Farm snowdrop walk 3/3/16 and 6/3/16  http://www.ngs.org.uk/gardens/find-a-garden/garden.aspx?id=17225

24 Seasons of Blakeney: February 20th to March 5th

Beginning of Spring

February 20- March 5th: Beginning of Spring

This time of year can have quite unpredictable weather. Year to year, and even day to day. The Japanese calendar labels this time with respect to rain water. While rain certainly features, I would describe the last two weeks as, changeable. One day I can find the warm earth under my hands in the garden, followed by snow and hail the next.

The geese continue to migrate, and birdsong can be heard in the afternoons. The current season from March 1-5 is named ‘Grass sprouts, trees bud’ on the 72 Season calendar and I couldn’t agree more. What a wonderful site, the new growth on trees. In the hedges the blackthorn is in blossom and on the verge the alexanders are starting to bud. 

February 20- March 5th: Beginning of Spring

February 20- March 5th: Beginning of Spring

In the garden when I look around it does not surprise me the yellow and purple are the colors of Easter. The Grape hyacinths and Anenome blanda are out in the courtyard. And on the road sides is another plant common this time of year that I just call ‘purples’. Their lack of official name does not diminish the joy they give when you see them. Meanwhile, in the cutting garden the first Daffodils have bloomed and are now adorning my dining room table. 
February 20- March 5th: Beginning of Spring

February 20- March 5th: Beginning of Spring

Work in the allotment has begun in earnest. Tomatoes, Marigolds, and Leeks are going through the propagator. The earth is warming and we have started digging over the scanty winter weeds before they take hold. It is just too tempting to plant seeds on warm days. After digging over last years cosmo bed I scattered Nigella “White lady” seeds, only to have it snow the following day! All this work justifies a trip to the Cley Deli for their delicious pies for a hearty lunch, and a slice of their cake to follow. In the evenings, beef seasoned for a week and slow cooked for 8 hours, is a weekend treat. 

February 20- March 5th: Beginning of Spring

February 20- March 5th: Beginning of Spring

When we aren’t scratching around in dirt, the weekends find us on long walks with a warm breeze, but still dressed for winter. 

February 20- March 5th: Beginning of Spring

February 20- March 5th: Beginning of Spring

The kayak comes back into regular use and gives us an upclose look the the birdlife on the marsh. As the boating season approaches, mooring maintenance becomes a priority in preparation. 

February 20- March 5th: Beginning of Spring

February 20- March 5th: Beginning of Spring

February 20- March 5th: Beginning of Spring

I am filled with anticipation of warm weather and new life.
Events: Daffodil and Snowdrop Walks at Bagthorpe Hall 22/2 and Horsted House 21/2
Holidays: St. David’s Day, March 1st. 

24 Seasons of Blakeney: February 5-19th

February 5-19th: Bright Cold

 The current season is Risshun or “start of spring” on the ancient Japanese seasonal calendar. This traditionally marked the New Year on the Japanese lunar calendar and seems an appropriate place to start for our 24 Seasons of Blakeney posts. At first “Spring” sounded overly optimistic for Norfolk this week, but on further reading is suggests that we are currently at peak cold and that things may gradually warm from here on in. Perhaps “spring coming” is closer to the truth. For our calendar I’ve decided on “Bright Cold” for Norfolk at this time of year. 

February 5-19th: Bright Cold

The wild plum blossom in the hedgerow this time of year always makes me happy, and a bit nervous for their delicate blooms. But what a sign of the promise of Spring!

February 5-19th: Bright Cold

For several years in a row now we have gone down to the dunes at Burnham Overy Staithe for a winter walk on a bright sunny day. Mid afternoon has a lovely golden glow with the angle of the sun low in the sky. In photos it looks summer-bright, and aside from our wooly hats it could be mistaken for late afternoon in June. The angle also produces some lovely purple dawns this time of year and they are getting earlier. The pink-footed geese which this coast is known for, have been making their migration, with thousands in the sky. This year we have had a lot of weather from the south-west, where normally our winter winds are fixed in the North, so Snettisham has seen fewer than usual. 

February 5-19th: Bright Cold

February 5-19th: Bright Cold

Tuesday I felt the first warmth in the sun for a long time while doing my semi-annual clean up of the courtyard. The snow drops and Tet a Tet bloomed while the heads of our mixed large narcissa pushed up among them. The allotment year has also started with the first chilli, tomato, and leek seeds going into the propagator. 
February 5-19th: Bright Cold

Marek headed out for the first kayak of the season on a bright crisp morning. Pubs remain a season staple after our chilly walks, while root vegetables, lentils, and roasts make up most of our dinners. And of course Pancake day is another highlight! We are lucky enough to still have carrots from the allotment and winter greens like perpetual spinach to tide us over until spring’s first flush of new produce. 

February 5-19th: Bright Cold

Events: Lexham Hall snowdrop walk 8/2 and 15/2

Holidays: Valentine’s Day 14/2

I have used italics to highlight the main features of the season. 

What does this time of year mean to you? We welcome all ideas to add to this Norfolk Calendar!

February 5-19th: Bright Cold

72 Seasons

  
“A year of nature, food and tradition seen through the ancient Japanese calendar… in which the year is divided into 24 and then 72 separate seasons.”
Marek introduced me to a new app this week and it immediately captured my imagination. 

72 Seasons is a new app by the Utsukushii Kurashikata Institute. The micro-seasons are depicted using photographs, illustrations, haiku poems and seasonal food. These come together to illustrate the subtle change in the natural world. The app follows path of the sun as seen from earth, 360 degrees divided into 24 seasons, each representing a 15-degree section and lasting about 15 days. 

   
   
The app is beautifully done and inspires reflection on your own life. I realised that we too follow a natural calendar here on the North Norfolk coast, or anywhere you live in tune with nature. I have long thought of certain times of year as, say, “hollyhock season”, “sea lavender season”, and “start of summer visitors season”. So I have decided to make my own version of this calendar to describe our personal journey living in Blakeney. The dates given are slightly flexible based on my research and provide a loose structure. Obviously each year is different but regardless of the precise date or order of events these are time markers in the natural world for all to see.