24 Seasons of Blakeney: April 22 – May 6


Green

Since our last update the acid green buds on the the trees have mellowed to an apple green. Blossom flutters in the air; the sloes are putting on a good show this year. We walked down the lane from Wiveton to the coast road and the petals snowed down on our heads from above. 


Everything is starting to fill out and become lush. The vivid blue ceanothus clouds glow from garden walls. The long-awaited dark pink blossom on the corner of Saxlingham road has finally come out: warm magenta hues.

 The air is now full of birdsong. The nightingales’ serenade can now be heard. The odd cry of the Northern lapwing calls over Blakeney and Cley marsh. The first swan pair glide down Cley Channel. 


On Mariner’s Hill the tiny white flowers blanket the southface. They spread a little further each year, around the bluebells and fennel. In the evening light they glow like a snow dusting. 


Barefoot season has started with a walk down the harbour at low tide! I always say there are two halves to the year in Blakeney, barefoot season and welly season. So pleased! We have also had our first BBQ’s on Cley beach. Fishing and sea bass sandwiches! This also leads us to start work by on the boat again and planning for a launch date! 

In the allotment the squash seeds have gone in. Sweet pea seedlings go along the dahlia walk. I can’t wait for their sweet scent to fill the house all summer. In the kitchen, the smell of slow cooked gammon hocks over lentils permeates. Rhubarb, rhubarb, and more rhubarb! Crumble with Banana! With pomegranate in cheesecake. Allotment produce is increasingly finding its way onto the table. Locally caught crab from Andy’s Crab Shed on toast with pea shoots and avocado! Delicious. 

And the tulips continue their show in the courtyard, on the allotment, and at East Ruston Old Vicarage. A must see!


24 Seasons of Blakeney, March 6-21st

Lime

This season is one of renewal and rebirth in nature. The Japanese calendar refers to it as “awakening of the hibernated (insects)”, but I like to think of in terms of colour; lime. A bright acid green is common to many new shoots before they mature into the various shades of green for the summer, and spring has it in abundance.

March 6-21st: Lime

March 6-21st: Lime

March 6-21st: Lime

On of my favourite bright green plants of the this time of year is the Alexander. Last year we made a delicious chutney with aniseed flavours, but waited a bit too late when the stems had gone woody. This year we are doing it earlier. It is the first foraging produce of the year in our calendar.

March 6-21st: Lime

The animals are awaking  as well with the first frogs in the courtyard and driveway. Around the middle of the month the Great Tit returned to the birch over the courtyard to serenade us with his call. On the marsh, the swallows return as well as the chiffchaff.

  
March 6-21st: Lime

The bulbs are in full swing with daffodils, crocus, hyacinths, and snowdrops filling the gardens and churchyards of the area. Adding to the spectacle are leucojum. The afternoon sun has some warmth in it and we enjoyed our first afternoons sitting the courtyard in the swing. My favorite place to relax. And at the end of the season we can see the first tulip shoots, a sure sign of warmer weather on its way.

March 6-21st: Lime

March 6-21st: Lime

With all the bulbs out the large gardens have started to open to the public and for Mother’s Day we visited RHS Wisley this year.

March 6-21st: Lime

The seedlings for the upcoming allotment year are soldiering on, adding the bright green tone of the season.

March 6-21st: Lime

 

Holidays: Mother’s Day (UK)

Events: East Ruston Old Vicarage Gardens open for daffodil season/Mother’s Day, 6/3/16 http://www.e-ruston-oldvicaragegardens.co.uk/pages/view/564/home.htm

Chestnut Farm snowdrop walk 3/3/16 and 6/3/16  http://www.ngs.org.uk/gardens/find-a-garden/garden.aspx?id=17225